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What is Your Orientation

What is your orientation like? God’s orientation, the way He sees things is totally different than the way we see things. And we have to adjust our orientation if we are going to follow Him. Let me give you an example. When God called Abraham, he comes out of Ur of the Chaldean, comes down through the crescent and he reaches the Land of Israel. If you know Israel by map, you would see the ridge that runs north to south through the middle of the country. To the left, there is the Mediterranean sea and to the right, the Jordan Valley. Our automatic orientation is that north would be up and left and right would be east and west.

So, Abraham comes into the Land that God promises him and there is too little grass for his herd and the herd of his nephew, Lot who was with him. The two men are both shepherds and both have a lot of flock, so there was a lot of arguing between the herdsmen. Abraham is a peacemaker who believes in the promises of God that he doesn’t have to fight to fulfill those promises. So he says to Lot, “you chose which land you want, left or right and whichever one you chose, me and my herdsmen will go to the other”.

When we make our decisions based on an earthly northward pattern, we may be way off. Our cultural backgrounds may dictate certain understandings that are really not the way God sees it. God’s north may be due east and not what you are thinking. So when you think about making decisions and lining yourself up with God’s values, you have to line it up according to His word, to get His orientation on things and then you’ll be able to make a proper decision in your walk with the Lord. But if you are basing your decisions based on a cultural understanding, you might be pitching your tent near Sodom and Gomorrah and that never ends well because bad company corrupts good morals. When you are making decisions, you want to be able to line yourself up with God’s word so that when He tells you to go left or right, you will know where you are headed.

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The Calling of Separation

Judges 13:7

And He said to me, ‘Behold, you shall conceive and bear a son. Now drink no wine or similar drink, nor eat anything unclean, for the child shall be a Nazirite to God from the womb to the day of his death.’”

13 So the Angel of the Lord said to Manoah, “Of all that I said to the woman let her be careful. 14 She may not eat anything that comes from the vine, nor may she drink wine or similar drink, nor eat anything unclean. All that I commanded her let her observe.”

1.

What do you think about when you hear about Samson?

Many of us may think of a guy who was really strong and powerful that fell asleep of the lap of the wrong girl. The next thing you know, he’s weak, blind and grinding wheat to feed his enemies.

While this is all true, it doesn’t really do justice to the story. Is it so simple that God just got mad at this guy for getting a bad haircut that He takes away his strength and leaves him helpless in facing his enemies?

This type of simplification of the story can create a distorted perception of who God is and how He deals with us.

The traditional site of Samson’s grave is right over here, let’s take a look.

The Biblical account states that Samson was buried in the tomb of his father and so you have here the graves of Manoah and Samson together.

But what is the real lesson of Samson? What can we learn from this man’s life?

2.

Samson’s mom was a barren women and couldn’t have children. But the Lord visit’s her and promises her a son that will begin to save Israel from the Philistines who ruled over them. He gives her specific instructions that she was to abstain from wine and unclean foods because Samson was to be a “Nazarite” to the Lord even from birth.

What was a Nazarite?

We think of Jesus being a “Nazarite” because He was from Nazareth. But the “Nazarite Vow” was what was taken as a symbol of ‘separation’ or ‘set apart’ for a season.

How was this ‘separation’ put into practice?

Numbers 6 is where the law of the Nazarite was described.

Numbers 6- The Law of the Nazirite

Then the Lord spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak to the children of Israel, and say to them: ‘When either a man or woman consecrates an offering to take the vow of a Nazirite, to separate himself to the Lord, he shall separate himself from wine and similar drink; he shall drink neither vinegar made from wine nor vinegar made from similar drink; neither shall he drink any grape juice, nor eat fresh grapes or raisins. All the days of his separation he shall eat nothing that is produced by the grapevine, from seed to skin.

‘All the days of the vow of his separation no razor shall come upon his head; until the days are fulfilled for which he separated himself to the Lord, he shall be holy. Then he shall let the locks of the hair of his head grow. All the days that he separates himself to the Lord he shall not go near a dead body. He shall not make himself unclean even for his father or his mother, for his brother or his sister, when they die, because his separation to God is on his head. All the days of his separation he shall be holy to the Lord.

‘And if anyone dies very suddenly beside him, and he defiles his consecrated head, then he shall shave his head on the day of his cleansing; on the seventh day he shall shave it. 10 Then on the eighth day he shall bring two turtledoves or two young pigeons to the priest, to the door of the tabernacle of meeting; 11 and the priest shall offer one as a sin offering and the other as a burnt offering, and make atonement for him, because he sinned in regard to the corpse; and he shall sanctify his head that same day. 12 He shall consecrate to the Lord the days of his separation, and bring a male lamb in its first year as a trespass offering; but the former days shall be lost, because his separation was defiled.

13 ‘Now this is the law of the Nazirite: When the days of his separation are fulfilled, he shall be brought to the door of the tabernacle of meeting. 14 And he shall present his offering to the Lord: one male lamb in its first year without blemish as a burnt offering, one ewe lamb in its first year without blemish as a sin offering, one ram without blemish as a peace offering, 15 a basket of unleavened bread, cakes of fine flour mixed with oil, unleavened wafers anointed with oil, and their grain offering with their drink offerings.

16 Then the priest shall bring them before the Lord and offer his sin offering and his burnt offering; 17 and he shall offer the ram as a sacrifice of a peace offering to the Lord, with the basket of unleavened bread; the priest shall also offer its grain offering and its drink offering. 18 Then the Nazirite shall shave his consecrated head at the door of the tabernacle of meeting, and shall take the hair from his consecrated head and put it on the fire which is under the sacrifice of the peace offering.

19 ‘And the priest shall take the boiled shoulder of the ram, one unleavened cake from the basket, and one unleavened wafer, and put them upon the hands of the Nazirite after he has shaved his consecrated hair, 20 and the priest shall wave them as a wave offering before the Lord; they are holy for the priest, together with the breast of the wave offering and the thigh of the heave offering. After that the Nazirite may drink wine.’

21 “This is the law of the Nazirite who vows to the Lord the offering for his separation, and besides that, whatever else his hand is able to provide; according to the vow which he takes, so he must do according to the law of his separation.”

In order to maintain the calling of a Nazarite, Samson had to maintain what made him ‘separate.’ The three primary things were:

No contact with dead things, any copse, human or animal, not even for the sake of burial of close relatives.

No contact with wine, or anything that comes from the vine, not even raisins.

No cutting of hair during the season of his separation.

3.

Early on, Samson kills a lion with the strength God gave him. But later he goes back and discovers that bees have made a hive in the dead carcass of the lion and he takes some to eat.

When he marries the Philistine girl, they have a weeklong party. It is very hard to believe that the Philitines he was partying with would understand him not being able to have some wine.

Then there is Delilah, whom he falls for. Samson has only one thing left that still distinguishes him as a Nazarite, his hair. He has never had a haircut since birth. People could see, because it was noticeable, that he was still a Nazarite. But now, with his head shaved, there was no longer anything left that made him ‘separate’ from others as his calling demanded.

4.

Judges 16:20-21

“And she said, “The Philistines are upon you, Samson!” So he awoke from his sleep, and said, “I will go out as before, at other times, and shake myself free!” But he did not know that the Lord had departed from him.

21 Then the Philistines took him and put out his eyes, and brought him down to Gaza. They bound him with bronze fetters, and he became a grinder in the prison.”

Here was a guy with a calling and God had gifted him with the ability to begin to deliver Israel, but he refused to recognize that to fulfill his calling he had to remain separate from the world around him.

God also has a calling on our lives, a plan that He desires us to enter into. To be a blessing to others and to defeat the enemies in our lives. But that plan can never be fulfilled unless we understand that God calls us to a life that is visibly separate from the world around us.

Samson is a sign for us, to help us understand that God will not go with us if we choose to go our own way.

Choose this day, the call of God on your life. Don’t cut short His plan for you in order to satisfy the short lived satisfactions of this life.

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Comparison is a Sickness

I was just a child in elementary school learning to read when I experienced something that would change my life. My teacher, who had also taught my older brother and sister before me, saw that I struggled to read and said, “If you are their sibling, why are you so different that you can’t read like them”? In that moment my confidence to read was shattered. For many years afterwards, I was terrified to read in front of people because one woman who had authority in my life spoke something negative over me. And as long as I believed those words, they had power in my life. 

One day I decided not to let them affect me anymore. I began reading out loud and was even able to read in front of the group I was teaching at the “Heart to Serve” seminar. When I shared this testimony with those who were present, they clapped for me because they saw that I could do it and in encouraged them to overcome their fears and weaknesses as well. 

Those who think they are weak have a lot to give. Many times, the weak are stronger than those who think they are strong. Yeshua told the apostle Paul, “My grace is sufficient for you, for My power is made perfect in weakness.” And Paul responded, “Therefore I will boast all the more gladly about my weaknesses, so that Messiah’s power may dwell in me”. – 2 Corinthians 12:8-10

Since I was born in the 1960’s, I remember the time when magazines came out featuring models as examples for beauty. Intelligent young women suddenly struggled with anorexia and depression because they were trying to be like those models and they couldn’t. How many times have we looked at other people’s Facebook pages or lifestyles or the opportunities other people have and we compare ourselves with them? It produces the same kinds of sickness! No one is supposed to be the same as anyone else. We were all created differently with sets of strengths and weaknesses. But God never intended that we should accomplish anything on our own. When we try to be perfect in the eyes of man, we fail because our trust is in ourselves and not in God. For it is “not by might nor by power, but by My Spirit,’ says the LORD of hosts”. – Zechariah 4:6. Apart from Him, we can do nothing. But He has given us the gift of His Holy Spirit and this same Spirit that raised Messiah from the dead lives in us! 

“But let him who boasts boast about this, that he understands and knows Me, that I am the LORD who exercises loving-kindness, justice and righteousness on the earth; for I delight in these things,” declares the LORD”. – Jeremiah 9:24.

If you have swallowed the lies of the enemy about who you are, I encourage you to face that lie with God’s truth and trust Him to give you the courage to see yourself through His eyes. He has given you great gifts to be used for His glory and as a blessing to others. So don’t let the enemy make you sick with comparison or depression about what you don’t have. Be thankful for all that God has given you and go out and make something of it! 

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What do you do when life is more than you can handle?

A woman and her husband made Aliyah from Russia in 2014 with their baby and they had another baby born here in Israel since then. 1 1/2 and 2 1/2 years old. Her husband wasn’t really stable in his mind and so he wasn’t really able to find a job. Their debt was growing and then he committed suicide in March. She is left alone with two very small children and a huge debt.

Dima was also working with her as a new immigrant. She was about to get evicted from her house and an organization helped her pay for one month’s rent. Orphans Promise can possibly help her with another month’s rent. Arik is going to try to help her close out her debt. The bank agreed to help reduce the debt from like 69,000 to 15,000 shekels. We sent out requests to several organizations and so hopefully we can close out her debt altogether.

Pray for this mom who is going through so much. She needs to care for her children, and for herself while dealing with all the bearocracy.

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The Value of Reflection

When we look into a mirror we are able to see what we normally cannot see which is a good look at ourselves. If you have ever had your spouse or a friend tell you that you have something stuck in your teeth when you smile, it illustrates why having a mirror can be valuable. We desire people to value us, and a mirror enables us to check ourselves and see us the way others see us.

One of the reasons we observe traditions in Israel is that it reminds us to ‘reflect’ and look back at what happened in the past. As with Passover, observing these festivals are opportunities to reflect and remember the joyful occasions of God’s deliverance. However, there are also times of remembrance of God’s correction in our lives. The 9th day of Av in the Jewish calendar is one of these observances where the Jewish people remember the tragedies of history and take time to reflect.

The 9th of Av is associated with multiple tragedies in Jewish history, the most important being the destruction of both the 1st and 2nd Temples in Jerusalem. In reflection on these tragedies, there is a value in knowing what led up to such severe acts of national judgement and destruction. When we apply this concept to our personal lives, it may be unpleasant to reflect back on these times because it forces us to revisit the places of our failures. But the value in times of reflection is not for the purpose of condemnation, but education. Remembering helps reinforce the lessons that were learned through the pain, and keeps us from repeating those failures.

The Bible teaches that we are to:

“Prove yourselves doers of the word, and not merely hearers who delude themselves. For if anyone is a hearer of the word and not a doer, he is like a man who looks at his natural face in a mirror; for once he has looked at himself and gone away, he has immediately forgotten what kind of person he was. But one who looks intently at the perfect law, the law of liberty, and abides by it, not having become a forgetful hearer but an effectual doer, this man will be blessed in what he does.” (James 1:22-25, NASU)

The value of what we hear and learn through God’s word is only as good as we are willing to walk it out. Like the story of creation in Genesis, God’s word brings order out of chaos, and our lives will gradually have a decline in chaos as we align ourselves with the statues of His word. 

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Loving Leadership

There are many different forms of leadership, and there are many motivations for wanting to become a leader. As I was driving through the Jordan valley, I looked at the mountains on the other side of the Jordan River, and I thought about Moses standing with the Lord on one of those mountains. The Lord had taken him up to Mt. Nebo so that he could look into the Promised Land that he would never enter. I thought about how loving and humble a man he had to be in order to lead the people of Israel for forty years, knowing that he himself would never enter into the promise.

Earlier in their journey in the wilderness there was a place where the complaints of the people with Moses brought him to a point of frustration. He was instructed to speak to a rock in the sight of Israel and bring water out of it. But in anger, he struck the rock and water came out. For this, God told Moses that he would not enter into the land of Canaan as promised.

When I think of this situation, wouldn’t it be so easy for Moses to blame the people for why he disobeyed God and hense received such a punishment? It is safe to say that most of us would probably have chosen to pick up and leave and wash our hands of these ungrateful, stiff necked people. Moses could have wrapped himself up in bitterness, but instead he chose to continue leading God’s people. What an amazing man to be able to see past where the people were at and to believe in the promises of God to transform them into what He was calling them to be. Moses continued in the wilderness to partner with God in the slow process, to intercede and teach this rough band of former slaves because he believed in the God who was able to complete what He had started.

It is very possible that Moses was aware of the transforming power of God in the life of a person because he had spent so many years of his own life in that same wilderness before anyone was following him. He had seen in his own life what God can do and it enabled him to continue to love and serve people who were very difficult to be with. Walking with others may not be an easy thing to do, but when you recognize how gracious God has been in His dealings with you, it may help to make it easier to see beyond where they are now and concentrate on what God has called them to become. This is the godly calling of leadership. It is not a place of authority and power so that others can serve you. It’s a place of allowing God to use you to serve others so that they come into their inheritance.

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Come Out of the Shadows

Jesus said we are the bride, but what does it mean to be His bride? A bride means first of all that we are the most beloved in His eyes- pure. Jesus sees us as pure although we know that we are not apart from His blood. The issue is that we look at ourselves in the mirror and see all the spots- the dark parts. Often, we lean either towards being very judgmental about ourselves or towards narcissism and in that case, we really don’t see. The truth is that we all have those areas that are unlovely and cause us to feel ashamed. Sometimes we get to a place where we see everything that is wrong with us and we don’t see ourselves in the mirror that He placed in front of us.

In the book of Song of Solomon 1:6, the woman that Solomon loves is feeling ashamed of who she is and unworthy of his love for her. She says, “Do not gaze at me because I am dark, because the sun has looked upon me. My mother’s sons were angry with me; they made me the keeper of the vineyards, but my own vineyard I have not kept!” This woman was not with prestige and servants. She was working in her father’s fields. Her skin was not flawless like a daughter of a king, but instead she bore the scars from the harshness of the sun. Essentially she is asking the question, “what do I have that you would choose to love ME?”

But her lover repeatedly responds with kindness and affirmation- “Behold, you are beautiful, my love, behold, you are beautiful!”- Song of Solomon 1:15. This lover is like our God. He does not see the scars that we see. He sees us with the eyes of love and He sees who we will become because of His love. Later in the second chapter verse 14, Solomon says to the woman, “My dove in the clefts of the rock, in the hidden places on the mountainside, show me your face, let me hear your voice; for your voice is sweet, and your face is lovely.” Is this not an incredible picture of God’s amazing love? This woman, like us, is hiding because of her shame and lack of self worth. But the lover, like God, desires to hear her voice, to see her face and to openly, unashamedly, reveal that this is the one he loves! 

Beloved, God is saying to you, “Come out of the shadows! I see you for who you are. Do not be ashamed of your scars for you are beautiful in My eyes!

Psalm 45:10-11 says, “Listen, daughter, and pay careful attention: Forget your people and your father’s house. Let the king be enthralled by your beauty; honor him, for he is your lord.” Further in verses 14 and 15 it says, “In embroidered garments she is led to the king; her virgin companions follow her— those brought to be with her. Led in with joy and gladness, they enter the palace of the king.” You see, when we receive God’s love for us and walk in our identity as His bride, we are changed and in turn, that change provokes others to want to know Him. Imagine it! Wouldn’t you want to meet the One who loves the unlovely, beautifies the broken and turns the shamed into the glorious? 

That my friends is exactly the work of God in our lives…at least it is for those who are willing to receive His love and come out from hiding in the shadows. 

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Establishing the Kingdom

In 2nd Samuel chapter five,  we see the establishment of David as king over all of Israel. This didn’t happen all at once. There was a long process between the time David was anointed by Samuel to be king as a young man and when David becomes the king of all Israel in Jerusalem. The process was a time of preparation, where both David and the children of Israel come to a place where they were ready to receive David as king.

The David who is anointed by Samuel is not the mighty man of war that we read about later.  He is an insignificant lad who is tending the sheep of his father. He is not even considered by his own family as anything special and is forgotten when the rest of the family attended the special sacrificial feast that the prophet Samuel showed up at. David had no accomplishments to put on a ‘resume’ in order to become the king of Israel.

God, however, sees the heart. He examined this boy and found something that He did not find in any of his brothers. We do not know the details about his battles with the lion and bear that he fought to protect his sheep. But we know that these hidden battles early on in life gave him a testimony that he carried with him into battle with the giant later on. He struggled against a strong adversary where no one could witness his bravery, and he experienced first-hand a God who gave him the victories. God saw the heart of a boy who cared so much for the dumb sheep entrusted into his care, he could be trusted to care for His people also.

The foundation of David’s life which was laid in this lonely time is where he found God to be a special companion. He may have become familiar with the stories that he had heard about God’s dealings with the Patriarchs and his ancestors. He may have even been like others who revered and worshiped this God of his fathers. But in the lonely place where David is of little significance, he experienced God in a way others didn’t. His extraordinary confidence in his personal relationship with a great God is why David’s courage stands out. When everyone else retreats in fear, David runs towards the challenge of the giant:

“You come to me with a sword, with a spear, and with a javelin. But I come to you in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. This day the Lord will deliver you into my hand, and I will strike you and take your head from you. And this day I will give the carcasses of the camp of the Philistines to the birds of the air and the wild beasts of the earth, that all the earth may know that there is a God in Israel. Then all this assembly shall know that the Lord does not save with sword and spear; for the battle is the Lord’s, and He will give you into our hands.” (1 Sam 17:45-47, NKJV)

God desires us to know him in the same way that David did. His call is not to just hear stories about Him from others, or even participate in distant worship and reverence. Not that these are bad things, but we miss out if we do not seek out more. It is in experiencing God in your own circumstances, and seeing His hand at work in your own life that enables you to become all that He has called you to be.

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For Your Glory, Lord

No one wants to suffer. In this day and age, we have so many luxuries that we think, “well, why should we have to suffer”? As believers, we have personal access to the God of the universe who can speak one word and heal us instantaneously, provide for us miraculously or create a universe for that matter. So, when we begin to suffer, we cry out to Him for help and if our circumstances don’t change, we think, “what just happened here? Doesn’t He see what I’m going through? Doesn’t He care?”

But what if God is allowing that suffering to do a work inside of us that could not be done through any other means? Or what if God has a greater purpose of salvation through our suffering? After all, wasn’t that what Yeshua went through for us? Yeshua never sinned and never deserved the suffering He endured when He walked the earth. Yet the Bible says that He was well acquainted with sorrow and grief (Isaiah 53:3) and was even separated from His Father when He bore the sins of the world on Himself. Did not Satan himself question Jesus concerning this matter of suffering? 

Jesus didn’t need to fast, but He did and He experienced hunger. It was when Jesus was hungry that Satan encouraged Him to use His power to turn the stones into bread. Why suffer if you have the power to change it? Satan then took him to a high place and showed him all the kingdoms and their splendor. “You can have it all, Jesus, and not have to suffer if You will bow and worship me”, Satan said in paraphrase. (See Matthew 4). But this was not the way the Father planned to bring the world salvation. Salvation for all men, women and children would come through Yeshua’s suffering. Remember, Yeshua left His throne to become a human like you and me and He chose this humility and suffering for your freedom and mine. There was a purpose to His suffering. 

Many times, this is what happens when we suffer also. Yes, God has all power and all authority over all the principalities and kingdoms of heaven and earth. He can speak one word and alter the course of history. He can heal us instantaneously and there are many times He does! He can open doors to our financial breakthroughs and can rescue us out of horrible relationships and the list of things He can do is literally infinate. Nothing is impossible for Him. But the truth is, His ways are not like our ways. And there is no formula. The only thing we know for sure is that He is good and His ways are perfect. So even when we don’t get what we want, the way we want, and when we want it- it does not mean that He is not hearing our prayers and at work in our situation. It’s just that there are times He chooses to walk through our suffering with us, giving us grace instead of deliverance, perseverance instead of rescue and revelation of who He is instead of the easy way out. When we experience suffering, we can trust the Lord to use it for His glory while we humble ourselves like Yeshua and pray – “Father, not my will, but Yours be done” (Luke 22:42). 

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The Source of Reaction

People are wired to respond to their environment. This trait is natural and has benefits for our preservation. But as we grow up, we discover that there are also ways that we react that are not beneficial and that we need to learn to control those reactions. Our reaction is our response to an event; it can be at a thought level, emotional level or a physical level. We will also react at various levels of intensity based on how close our connection is to an event. When I watch a sporting event and the team I like loses, I will be a little disappointed, but move on quickly because I’m not very connected (I do realize that some of us are more intense than others in this example). If my daughter were to have a medical emergency, I would react by immediately dropping everything else in order to get to a doctor because I’m very connected. If we take some time to think about it, our reactions and the intensity of the reactions can tell us a lot about our own priorities.

When we drive we use gauges on our dashboard to let us know if there is anything wrong with the way the car is running. It helps us to know when to stop for gas, or if the engine is overheating and need more coolant. Similarly, our priorities are the engine that keeps us moving down the road and our reactions can function like a gauge letting us know if something is wrong. If you wanted to control someone, all you would have to do is learn what they will react to, and then manipulate events to cause the desired reaction.

If we want to learn to react in a way that honors God, we will be forced to adjust our priorities and resemble His. When Jesus came, His concern and priority was the Kingdom of Heaven. That was His primary motivator. In the temptations in the wilderness, Satan’s first attempt to cause Jesus to react was out of hunger.

“Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. And when He had fasted forty days and forty nights, afterward He was hungry. Now when the tempter came to Him, he said, “If You are the Son of God, command that these stones become bread.”
But He answered and said, “It is written, ‘Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God.’” (Matt 4:1-4)

Jesus’ response placed His priorities with that of knowing that He relied on God for his sustenance, and wouldn’t react out of His genuine earthly need for food. What this did was take away Satan’s ability to use physical need for food as a tool of manipulation.

Another point of leverage that Satan tries to use is what we feel close to. Here is a passage that goes with little notice: “While He was still talking to the multitudes, behold, His mother and brothers stood outside, seeking to speak with Him. Then one said to Him, “Look, Your mother and Your brothers are standing outside, seeking to speak with You.”
But He answered and said to the one who told Him, “Who is My mother and who are My brothers?” And He stretched out His hand toward His disciples and said, “Here are My mother and My brothers! For whoever does the will of My Father in heaven is My brother and sister and mother.” (Matt 12:46-50)

In the society that Jesus was raised in, clan and family were the top priority. Even today, many loyalties are ‘clan’ based. The family or clan is the inner circle of intimacy, and the expected response is that family takes priority over outsiders. Jesus’ doesn’t respond based on society’s values, His response creates a circle of intimacy that is deeper than blood relations; it is the ‘family of faith’ that takes priority. He points to His disciples, the ones who follow Him day to day, and says: “Here are My mother and My brothers!” Jesus is showing us by example what our priorities need to adjust to.

Today we hear many calling out for ‘Justice.’ Just like our other examples, like eating in response to hunger or intimacy of family, ‘justice’ is not a bad thing, but as events happen- let us closely examine whether we are just reacting to manipulation. When Jesus was judged by those who sentenced Him to death, He knew that He was in the center of God’s will, and that God is sovereign. Even though those who were judging Him were being unjust, Jesus is not interested in justice in His circumstance; He is wholly submissive to the will of His Father. His priority was the Kingdom of Heaven, and that seeking justice from the kingdoms of men was futile.

Jesus gives us an example that forces us to examine our priorities. It is our reaction and the intensity of our response that will tell us where our priorities lie. As we allow ourselves to examine our responses, we may discover that much of our peace is taken away in areas where our priorities don’t line up with that of the Kingdom of Heaven.

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